FASHION FRIDAY: WAISTED, AGAIN

Adeline cap sleeve peplum dress

Adeline cap sleeve peplum dress

Baggy tunics, slouchy tees, and boyfriend sweaters! Great looks, but they wasted the waist, slim lines hidden from view under the bulk.

The good news is now the waist is back big time, thanks to the recycling of an old trend: the peplum.

Peplum first arrived the fashion scene in the 1800s, short overskirts flouncing from the waist, fitted jackets flaring over hoop skirts. But the trend’s real moment in the sun dates back to 1947, when designer Christian Dior debuted his “Bar” suit, with its nipped in waist jacket and padded, peplumed hips. The hourglass figure of the next decade+, a feminine shape that drove “Mad Men” mad, had arrived.

Peplum styles were last seen in the 1980’s – along with big shoulders and big hair. The current trend can be traced back to spring 2011 couture collections. This fall, the look hit mainstream, showing up everywhere, from high fashion houses to J. Crew.

According to designer Vera Wang, “A peplum is a play on proportion to make the waist look slimmer.” And clearly an accentuated midsection is a no-brainer for all the lucky ladies with small waists, but the question remains: “Are peplums flattering on everyone.” Answer: “Not really.”

Flair waist long sleeve top by Regina

Flair waist long sleeve top by Regina

The statement is true for a variety of womanly figures. For example, the extra fabric at the waist suggests hips on a boyish body, creating the illusion of a smaller mid section. It hides hips on a fuller figure, creating a more elegant line while retaining dramatic curves. The look works as long as the peplum is not too short or too long, too ruffly or too ruched. However, for those with no waist at all or short-waisted women, the peplum is a no-go.

If your body meets the basic requirements, come visit us at our Main Street boutique, Two Skirts Telluride, and check out our new peplum styles.

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