MUSEUM OFFERS FIVE UNIQUE WAYS TO TOUR TELLURIDE'S COLORFUL HISTORY 

Throughout August, the Telluride Historical Museum offers five different kinds of historical tours. Walking tours are $15 per person, include free admission to the museum and begin at the Museum.

Every Wednesday: Join the Telluride Historical Museum and George Greenbank for an Architecture Tour! Meet at the Museum. 10a.m. $15. Tours feature a new section of town each week.

Every Friday: Join the Telluride Historical Museum and Ashley Boling for a Historic Walking Tour of Town! Meet at 1p.m.

August 4: Join the Telluride Historical Museum for a Hike into History with Todd Brown. Marshall Basin.

Meet at Museum, 7:45 a.m. to carpool (4×4 recommended) to Tomboy. Hike into Marshall Basin, the seldom seen location where the richest deposits around Telluride were located. Hike along the deserted electric railway from the Tomboy mill, past the upper terminal of the Tomboy Tram and the Ophir Mine portal, and climb into Marshall Basin. Pass remnants of the Pioneer Milling Company’s still-standing 10-stamp mill, the remains of the Union, Smuggler, and Sheridan mines.

Depending on weather, climb as high as the Mendota mine, topping out about 12,000′ before returning to the vehicles. This hike is along the old road, so it’s relatively good footing and not terribly steep, but it is vigorous and high.

Round trip time from Tomboy is about four hours, including a lunch stop. ($10/ Museum/members, $15/non-members.)

August 18 & 19: Join the Telluride Historical Museum and Andrea Benda for a Cemetery Tour of Lone Tree Cemetery! Meet at the Museum at 3:45p.m. before the jaunt or drive to the Lone Tree Cemetery.

August 24 – 26: The Telluride Historical Museum presents a 4×4 Field Trip. Leadville to Aspen. “In Search of Colorado’s Silver Heritage,” with local historian Rudy Davison. $65 per person. Lodging and food not included. Limited space. RSVP today or learn more at telluridemuseum.org.

Photo caption: Ashley Boling starts his historical walking tours at the museum’s amphitheatre. 

Comments are closed.